Category Archives: Blog

Personal Narrative for Seventh Grade

Your task: Write a multi-paragraph narrative about an incident from your life. Include information about the choice you made and the consequences of your action. Be sure to:

  1. Include the elements of incident, response, and reflection.
  2. Use transitions to connect ideas for your reader.
  3. Include insights about the effects and consequences of the choice.

Need ideas? Ask yourself these questions

  • What are some of the best things that have happened to you?
  • What are some of the worst things that have happened to you?
  • What are some of the most significant learning experiences you have encountered?
  • What are some other ideas for topics of interest to you?

We will use the Grade 7_Writing Workshop 1to go through the process.

The Scholarship Jacket

Reread The Scholarship Jacket.

Complete the text dependent questions. Come to class prepared to discuss.

  1. Craft and Structure: What does Martha mean by “rooted” against the wall in paragraph 4?
  2. Key Ideas and Details: What can be inferred from the conversation Martha overheard between her two teachers?
  3. Craft and Structure: Reread paragraphs 16-18. Compare and contrast Martha’s point of view about the scholarship jacket with her grandfather’s. Include details from the text that reveal each character’s point of view.
  4. Key Ideas and Details: What makes the principal suddenly change his mind in paragraph 30? How do you know?
  5. Key Ideas and Details: Martha overhears and then engages in several conversations in this story. How does each conversation move the story forward?
  6. Key Ideas and Details: In the last paragraph, Martha’s grandfather reacts silently to her news about the jacket. If he had spoken to his granddaughter, what might he have said? What evidence in the story supports your answer?

The Challenge of Heroism Introduction (8)

Watch and complete the Ted-Ed Heroism lesson. Pause and take notes as needed.

Overview of the Hero’s Journey (from Novel-Software)

Here is a brief overview of the elements of the Hero’s Journey, with more detailed explanation below.

Act 1

  • Introduction to the protagonist’s world
  • Call to action
  • Crossing the threshold

Act 2

  • Mentor teaches the lead
  • First challenge
  • Temptation
  • Dark moment

Act 3

  • Final conflict
  • Return home

More detail of the stages in the journey

Act 1

You set the scene, introduce your character and their normal life, just in time for them to…

  • Call to action

… be torn from it! Actually it’s better if they’re not torn, but have to commit to the decision themselves. In any case, the challenge is put forward. You can start building sympathy for your character by ensuring their decision is something the reader can identify with and / or respect.

  • Crossing the threshold

In order to ensure your lead has the pressure on and therefore your readers are hooked into wondering how they’ll ever get out of this mess, it’s good if your hero crosses some kind of threshold that is difficult, if not impossible, to get back to normal life from. It may be a physical journey across land, the removal of allies, self-inflicted isolation or becoming wanted and on the run.

Act 2

  • Mentor teaches the hero

Readers want to see a character develop into a real hero who can overcome the odds. Everybody needs help sometimes. Mentors in popular fiction include Dumbledore, Morpheus, Rafiki and Obi Wan Kenobi.

  • First challenge

Time to put your lead under pressure. It may be that they have a first encounter with the villain, or for a slower build, it could be the villain’s cronies.

  • Temptation

I can resist everything except temptation, said someone pithy. Add depth to your lead by giving them a challenge they have to find the strength of character to overcome.

  • Dark moment

As you near the climax of your book, circumstances start piling up. Push your lead to the limits to the point they are questioning everything they know, and very nearly slip to the dark side. The closer they get to failing, the more nail-biting it will be. But in the end they pull through, which brings them to…

Act 3

  • Final battle

The final battle! This is the climax of your story and you must pull out all the stops to make it great. We’ll work on this in great detail later, looking at what makes a satisfying ending, so for now you should just have a loose idea of whether your hero succeeds or fails.

  • Return home

Once your climax is completed all there is to do is tie up loose ends, will your lead live happily ever after? Do they return home or stay in their new place? Who is with them at the end?